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Using Existing Transit Corridors

I wrote my University thesis on building transit routes on existing corridors. Let's think about what that means for a moment.

Urban areas, are increasingly becoming hell to live in, because of one thing: TRAFFIC! And the root cause is more cars and not necessarily more people.

Public transit is one of the easiest ways to embrace growth and give some relief from the congestion that the major passages, routes and throughways deal with.

But where do we put the transit? Urban centers are running low on space and suburbs are not dense enough to justify any real form of rapid transit. Sure you can go underground (ie. a subway), but that is VERY expensive and not very efficient in low-density suburban areas. My thesis, focused on placing rapid bus transit (or light-rail) lines on existing corridors. Existing corridors, include hydro-fields, old railroad tracks and highway buffers that are already "exist" and cut-through our cities. Bus rapid transit, when having its own right-of-way, is just as fast and efficient as rail. The vehicles costs much less and can also be used more flexibly.

The advantages of using existing corridors are VERY evident and it is a big surprise, this idea is not being considered more seriously by municipalities and regional governments. The obvious advantage is cost. There is little choice with route planning and no land needs to be expropriated. There is little to no distraction to the public during construction/maintenance as all work would be done away from major populations. The natural buffers that existing corridors provide would also limit noise and air pollution.

If you are a planner, politician or just curious, please contact me to share ideas on "Transit Routes on Existing Corridors."

BUS RAPID TRANSIT ON AN EXISTING CORRIDOR

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